TV tonight: Cara Delevingne has an orgasm in the name of science | Television

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Planet Sex with Cara Delevingne 10pm, BBC Three “I’m here to have an orgasm and donate it to science!” Supermodel turned presenter Cara Delevingne spends the next 15 minutes masturbating in a hospital room. She’s certainly a very game host in this six-part investigative series looking at all aspects of […]

Planet Sex with Cara Delevingne


10pm, BBC Three

“I’m here to have an orgasm and donate it to science!” Supermodel turned presenter Cara Delevingne spends the next 15 minutes masturbating in a hospital room. She’s certainly a very game host in this six-part investigative series looking at all aspects of modern sex. Outraged at the orgasm gap (research shows that only 65% of women climax through sex, while 95% of straight men do every time), she speaks with experts and activists on a “cliteracy” mission. In the opening episode, she also goes to Japan – where it is illegal to show material with female genitalia on it – and meets the woman rebelling by paddling around in a yellow canoe modelled on her own vagina. Hollie Richardson

The English

9pm, BBC Two

Rewind: it’s 1875, and Thomas Trafford (Tom Hughes) arrives in Chalk River, Wyoming, to set up his cattle ranch, alongside accountant and aide David Melmont (Rafe Spall) and a local guide, Thin Kelly (Steve Wall). It’s both a prelude to a terrible massacre and the spur for Cornelia’s (Emily Blunt) own epic journey 15 years later.Ali Catterall

The Secret Genius of Modern Life

8pm, BBC Two

Tonight’s fascinating look into our everyday gadgets and modcons focuses on the electric car. Prof Hannah Fry uncovers the role that meat packing played in almost derailing the now-booming industry, and how camcorder batteries led to Tesla and Twitter-owner Elon Musk’s fortune. Sammy Gecsoyler

Taskmaster: The Final

9pm, Channel 4

The latest series of this joyously absurd challenge show climaxes, having managed to inject levity and good cheer into a bleak autumn. But who will become the 14th Taskmaster champion? Before we find out, Dara Ó Briain’s eye colour is up for debate and John Kearns searches for grapes as if his life depended on it. Phil Harrison

Live at the Moth Club

10pm, Dave

Kemah Bob shines in Live at the Moth Club on Dave. Photograph: Claire Haigh/UKTV

Postponed from last week, this comedy showcase captures life on- and off stage in east London’s Moth Club. Performing a mix of standup and sketches, the cast of funny people featured tonight include Kemah Bob, Jamie Demetriou (as the club’s “city boy” punter), Phil Wang (performing a set written by the tech assistant) and Natasia Demetriou and Ellie White (as hipster PRs). SG

The Horne Section TV Show

10pm, Channel 4

For the last episode of his nicely loose meta-comedy, Alex Horne drafts in old pal and Taskmaster consultant Tim Key to play Ken, a shifty celebrity psychologist who helps fix the bad professional relationships that are making Horne’s fictional alter ego such a failure. As Ken makes it worse, it is again left to Thora (Desiree Burch) to be the only sane person in the room. Jack Seale

Film choice

Crank

11.10pm, ITV4

A man in a suit, seemingly at the top of a building, pushes Jason Statham by the shoulders
A stressful moment for Jason Statham in Crank on ITV4. Photograph: Lions Gate/Everett/Rex

Crank, the exact scientific opposite of The Elephant Man, is the film in which Jason Statham has to stay alive by keeping his adrenaline topped up by any means possible. This means he must fight, take drugs, drive as erratically as he can and have sex in public places, all while giving one of the least self-conscious performances of his career. It’s an obnoxious film, this – gratuitous and leering and thoroughly empty. That said, it is an example of a perfectly realised concept. If you’re after edge-of-your-seat gonzo spectacle, this is the film for you. Stuart Heritage

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